My Top Picks for SWF’s All Day YA

If you don’t know what Sydney Writers’ Festival is, it’s this amazing literary festival that happens every year in the heart of Sydney. Recently relocated to Carriageworks, the festival is simply an incredible place to be. They also feature the amazing All Day YA program at Riverside Parramatta.

This will be my second year attending All Day YA, with my first being the initial moment I stepped out of the house and realised there was an entire day dedicated to YA loving bookworms. If there’s one thing I know about Sydney Writers’ Festival is it gets better and better every year.

All taking place at Riverside Parramatta on Saturday 5th of May, the lineup for this year’s All Day YA program is brilliant and here are my top picks!

From the Sidelines (10am – 11am)

This is possibly one of my most anticipated events! This panel will be answering these questions: Is it enough to include diverse voices if their only role is to prop up the hero? Why does the quiet kid always need to be saved by a cool romantic interest? I need to know.

Youth Curator Rameen Hayat will be chatting to Tamar Chnorhokian, Sarah Ayoub, Michael Mohammed Ahmad and Patrick Ness about diversity and tokenism in YA fiction and I cannot wait!

Burn The Book: Real Girls in YA (11:30am – 12:30pm)

This is right up my alley. This panel asks the ultimate question: What does it mean to be a ‘real’ girl?

Chatting with Youth Curator Kellie Phan, Alicia Tuckerman, Rebecca Lim, Jenna Guillaume, and Tara Eglington will be exploring about all those experiences we have as young females: from friendships to frenemies to first loves. Breaking stereotypes and kicking ass – that’s what I love about realistic female characters and this panel sounds like a blast!

Architects of New Worlds (1:30pm – 2:30pm)

If that title of this panel doesn’t interest you, we’re gonna have a problem. I adore world building, especially in sci-fi and fantasy. Reading about post-apocoalyptic worlds, catastrophes or tyrannical regimes are aalways so fascinating. This panel sounds perfect for those who want to know what it’s like creating dystopian worlds that ignite the imagination, and forcing us as readers to reflect on our world.

Adele Walsh discovers how real-life concerns have influenced Jesse Andrews, an acclaimed novelist and screenwriter; Cally Black, who writes genre-smashing YA sci-fi; Claire G. Coleman, whose debut novel explores a future Australia that is colonised again; and Jay Kristoff, a bestselling fantasy and sci-fi author.

Bringing Imaginary Worlds to Life (3pm – 4pm)

This is almost like a companion panel to Architects of New Worlds, except we get to hear about MAPS! We all love maps. Right? Illustrators have their time in the spotlight as This panel discusses how they draw a fantasy-world map and show examples of their previous work. Expand your imagination with author and illustrator Chris Riddell, Oscar–winning animator Shaun Tan, award–winning children’s illustrator Nicki Greenberg and A Song of Ice & Fire illustrator Levi Pinfold.

The Future of Writing (4:30pm – 5:30pm)

I’m a writer. Sometimes I think I’m a terrible writer, but the other day I found an old manuscript and literally wanted to toss it out because I realised how much I’ve evolved as a writer. This panel simply speaks to me.

The panel features author Anna Todd, whose success with fan-fiction favourite After has resulted in publishing houses increasingly looking to online self-publishing for new stories with a built-in fan base. The panel will explore digital platforms, author freedom and technology in modern publishing. Three incredible writers – Tonya Alexandra, Alison Croggon and Jay Kristoff – sit down with YA author and Twitter famous Jenna Guillaume to chat about how technology is reshaping writers’ lives and how it has influenced their careers.

I don’t know about you, but I’m gearing up for May 5th. Come down, hang out with fellow bookworms, and have fun. You’ll also see me there so don’t hesitate to say hi!

 

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What the Heck Did I Read In March?

It’s ya girl, Sofia. I’m back with another heckin’ blog post about my reading habits because I know you all love reading these (I know you do). 

March was hectic af. I started my final year of uni. I’m now co-hosting a fantasy/sci-fi book club called The Name of the Book. I’ve been writing, editing and working non-stop. 

I just wanna sleep for a few years, you know? 

But I did get some reading done, and here are my mini reviews on my March reads. 

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Author Q&A and Book Review: Neverland by Margot McGovern

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Neverland by Margot McGovern 

Publisher: Penguin Teen

Synopsis: Kit Learmonth would rather die than grow up and leave Neverland…
When she was twelve, Kit Learmonth watched her parents drown in a storm as their boat sailed over the Tranter Sink Hole. Now seventeen, Kit doesn’t remember the incident, and she doesn’t want to. In fact, her only clear memories from before her parents’ death are of the fantastical stories of pirates and mermaids that she and her dad invented about the small island where she grew up, a place she calls Neverland. 

Following Kit’s parents’ deaths, her uncle and guardian, Doc, transformed the island into a boarding school for mentally ill teenagers and sent Kit away to school on the mainland. But when Kit tries and fails to end her life, Doc brings her home to the island and places her in the care of his colleague, Dr Hannah Ward. 

Resisting her treatment, Kit instead pulls her friends deeper into her world of make-believe. It’s only when Kit and her new boyfriend, Rohan, take the fantasy too far and land themselves in very real danger that her faith in Neverland is shaken, and Kit must find a way back to reality.

GOODREADS | BOOKTOPIA | PENGUIN TEEN

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7 Favourite Books of 2017

I have one question: how the heck did 2017 wrap up so quickly? It doesn’t feel like 12 months have passed at all. However, 2017 brought into my possession a great deal of amazing books. Yet I’ll only be picking seven, so here they are.

Stalking Jack the Ripper by Kerri Mansicalco

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Wrapped in murder, mystery and intrigue, Stalking Jack the Ripper kept me fascinated on every page. I adored the relationship between Audrey Rose and Thomas, and the authenticity of Jack the Ripper within the story. An overall amazing YA historical fiction.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

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I have a confession: I watched the show before I read the book. Before you hate on me, I found the book to be just as raw and heartbreaking as the show. Despite the subtle changes to some characters, the grittiness and pain in Offed’s words will resonate with me for a long time.

The Epic Crush of Genie Lo by F.C Yee

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A book about an Asian-American girl and the Monkey King from an Asian author – how could I not read it? Not only is the writing amazing, the characters are hilarious and down-to-earth, and I loved how Yee integrated the story of the Monkey King into a modern setting. A definite favourite!

The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli

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I have so many feelings about this book, it’s not even funny. It’s so squishy and adorable. The writing is brilliant, the characters are extra cute and the message within the story are lovely. I’m getting all mushy thinking about it.

Heart of Mist by Helen Scheuerer

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A fantastic debut by an Aussie author. This fantasy tale swept me off my feet and gave me so many feelings. I loved how well Scheuerer executed multiple perspectives and delivered a refreshing twist on YA fantasy. This is a must-read if you haven’t picked it up already.

The Beginning of the World in the Middle of the Night by Jen Campbell

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Breathtaking, beautiful and macabre. Campbell has a way with words and weaving together intricate tales of love, loss and pain. Out of the 12 short stories, my favourite was Little Deaths. It was so strange that I fell in love so quickly.

Turtles All the Way Down by John Green

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I’m just as surprised as you to see this book on my favourites list. I really wasn’t expecting to like it, let alone love it, but I did. The way Green wrote about Aza’s anxiety through metaphors was beautiful. While the plot itself is rather thin, its the characters that bring this book to life.

 

 

 

Top 5 Spooky Reads for Halloween

31st of October marks Halloween, an old Celtic tradition where fires were lit and people dressed in costumes to ward away ghosts and supernatural creatures. The boundary between life and death was blurred.

Now, it’s an annual holiday with trick-or-treating, pumpkins carved into jack o’lanterns and much more adventurous outfits. But whether you’re a believer in the supernatural or not, there are things out there that will scare you.

So to keep you in the spooky mood of Halloween, here are the top 5 books that will make your skin crawl:

Sleeping Beauties by Stephen King and Owen King

Source: Goodreads.

Like father, like son. In this collaborative novel, Sleeping Beauties asks one question: what would the world be like if the women disappeared? Set in a small town, the women fall asleep and become encased in a cocoon. If the gauze around their bodies is disturbed, the women wake up, feral and violent; if undisturbed, they sleep and go to another place. The men become primal, and among all this is a woman named Evie who has not fallen asleep yet. What is most horrifying about this book is it could potentially happen – the future is filled with possibilities.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Source: Amazon.

This classic Gothic novel defined the sci-fi genre, and Shelley utilises horror conventions like a master. A cautionary tale about playing God and the power of science, Victor Frankenstein assembles a creature with stolen human body parts and animates it. The hideous creature, rejected by his creator, sets about exacting revenge. Asking questions about the nature of humanity, bio-terrorism and responsibility, this novel will thrill you.

Coraline by Neil Gaiman

Source: Goodreads.

This is a children’s tale, but don’t let it fool you, it is downright scary. The protagonist, Coraline, moves into a new home with thirteen doors and twenty-one windows. However, there is a fourteenth door, and it is locked. On the other side is a brick wall. But when Coraline unlocks the door, she finds a passage to an apartment just like hers, but things are different. In fact, they’re better. But everything has a price, and Coraline realises the cost of living in the new apartment comes with changing herself completely. The film is also amazing, so check it out if you can.

The Passage by Justin Cronin

Source: Goodreads.

This apocalyptic story features a desolate world overrun by vampire-like creatures enhanced by a virus, one that was created and unleashed by a secret U.S military department. With a handful of survivors left, it’s a constant struggle between predator and prey. FBI agent Brad Wolgast is haunted by his past, and encounters a six-year-old orphan named Amy Harper Bellafonte, a refugee from the military project that started the end of the world. Fighting to keep her safe, and unaware of Amy’s role in the new world, this novel will take you on a suspensful and chilling journey that documents the endurance of humanity in the face of extinction.

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

Source: Goodreads.

This supernatural thriller is a part of the works that defined the horror genre. Truly terrifying, the story follows four people who arrive at Hill House looking to encounter a scary phenomena: Eleanor, a woman who is well informed about poltergeists; Dr. Montague, an occult scholar searching for evidence of  a haunting; Theodora, his assistant; and Luke, the heir to Hill House. But the house has its own agenda, and looks like one of the four will have to stay in Hill House.

Happy reading!

Originally published at Chattr

Author Helen Scheuerer Q&A: “I’m 27, and I still love YA.”

Helen Scheuerer is the founding editor of Writer’s Edit and the author of Heart of Mist, out now! Heart of Mist is the first book in The Oremere Chronicles, an epic fantasy series from new imprint, Talem Press. You can find Heart of Mist on Amazon and Goodreads.


First off, a big congratulations to Helen on her debut! Heart of Mist is a fantastic book (you can read my starred review here) and I had the honour of interviewing Helen about her writing. We discuss the nitty gritty of her strong female characters, her inspiration for Heart of Mist, and what it means to be a YA author.

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Where did you find inspiration for strong female characters? 

Before Heart of Mist, I had a contract with a small publisher for a literary fiction novel. I think that novel was very much shaped by my creative writing degree where we were reading a lot of “serious” literature. The common theme in this literature was it was written by men about men from men’s perspectives.

From that, I fell into a rabbit hole where I thought “serious” literature had to be about men and if it was from a women’s perspective, it would be perceived as “chick-lit” or it wouldn’t be taken seriously. Which is why this literary fiction novel had parallel perspectives of a young boy and a man.

It was during the structural edits of this book that I started reading YA fantasy again, books like Throne of Glass, The Winner’s Curse, and The Queen of the Tearling. What they all had in common was a main strong female protagonist who was kicking butt and being awesome. I loved reading these stories. I started asking myself, “Why aren’t I writing what I love reading?” I was sick of writing about men for men.  I want to have fun while I was writing. I wanted to reach an audience I was invested in – young adult women. I wanted to be taken seriously, especially as a female author.

Who are your top 5 favourite female characters? 

While these ladies are not all the stereotype of strong, they are all unique and brilliant in their own way. I believe that you shouldn’t want or have to strip away femininity in order to be ‘strong’. You can have both.

  • Delilah Bard from A Darker Shade of Magic
  • Laia from Ember in the Ashes
  • Aelin Ashryver Galathynius/Celaena Sardothien  from Throne of Glass
  • Claire Fraser from Outlander
  • Molly Weasley from Harry Potter 

I’d like to do a comparison between Bleak and Henrietta. With consideration on the word ‘strong’, how did you craft these two very different women? 

When it came to Henri and Bleak, I was wary of the female warrior trope being associated with masculinity, and I didn’t want to have a strong female character who was masculine. Bleak isn’t particularly feminine, but she’s not your typical idea of strong. One of her strengths is her battle with her alcohol addiction.

Initially, these characters came to me with certain traits and blurry faces. It was during the revisions of my first draft that they started to form into more wholesome characters. I created mood and character boards for them on Pinterest, and while I wrote one perspective, I’d have their board up on a second monitor. Their boards had physical attributes, as well as aesthetics to give me a feel of them.

I had this really strong feeling about Henri, like she was abrasive. She’s hard around the edges. In contrast, Bleak was murky. With my visual aids, it really helped in developing them. Her alcohol addiction is a big part of her, and it’s a huge thing for a young character to deal with. I had to consider the consequences and withdrawal symptoms, diving into research on alcoholism. It was really interesting, and I used a particular case to shape how Bleak handled her withdrawal.

I wanted them to be independent and not be seeking out the ‘other half’ to themselves. Each of them is a whole person, and while they’re both so different, they’re similar in their inner strengths.

What was your inspiration for the Valian? 

When I was in year 12, we studied the Spartan society and one thing that always stood out to me was the fact that if a child wasn’t strong enough it got left out to die. The whole point of this was to try and weed out the weak, but what they didn’t realise was strength came in different ways.

Of course, the Amazons also inspired the Valian, so in essence, the Valian are a mash-up of the Amazons and the Spartans. It’s a society of women, run by women, with an attitude of ‘take no prisoners’.  But I didn’t want to put it on a pedestal and say ‘this is a perfect society’.

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Helen’s novel, Heart of Mist.

Was the feminist tone throughout Heart of Mist intentional? 

Heart of Mist was a reaction of mine to a lot of conversations I was having when I was writing it, particularly with my girlfriends about how being a woman affects your everyday life differently to men. When you think about the subtle misogynistic things that women face on a daily basis, it’s incredibly difficult. So I suppose rather than intentional, it was just something that came naturally to the book.

What’s your opinion on sex in YA?

I don’t believe in glossing over stuff for young adults. It’s a time when young adults have a lot of firsts, so to have a book aimed at young adults about young adults for the most part and not include any sex, romance or feelings doesn’t do anybody any justice. I’m very much all for including those aspects in my writing. If a character presents those kinds of feelings then I’ll happily write about it.

Why do you want to write YA? 

All the books I’ve fallen head over heels for are in that genre. I also find the community to be so wonderful and great to be a part of. Everybody is supportive, everyone is talking and exploring. I’m 27 and I still love YA. Even though Heart of Mist is marketed as YA, everybody is welcome to enjoy the story.

Heart of Mist is the first book published from Talem Press, a fantasy imprint of Writer’s Edit. What’s really cool is Talem is latin for empower, which I think encompasses what I want a lot of our stories to be like. We want to be publishing works that empower young women. Give me more books about empowering young women. Reading about female experiences and talking about it with other people is what it’s about.


Helen is a YA fantasy author based in Sydney and has her own website here. She can also be found on Twitter and Instagram. You can purchase Heart of Mist from Talem Press or Amazon.

#TheReadingQuest Sign Up Post & TBR

Hi everyone! I am so freaking excited because I’m signing up for #TheReadingQuest! This is a video-game based reading challenge created by Aentee @Read at Midnight and oh my lord, isn’t this just the best thing ever? The lovely graphics are done by the one and only CW @Read, Think, Ponder and what a fantastic job she’s done. I’m in love with her work.

The quest is running from August 13th to September 10th, which in all honesty isn’t a lot of time considering I’ve been reading at the pace of a sloth. But hey, I believe in myself.

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So without further ado, because I love to procrastinate, here is my TBR for #TheReadingQuest.

1. A book that has a TV/movie adaption

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For this I’m going with The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. After watching the TV series, I figured it’d be appropriate to read the book considering it’s so well regarded.

2. A fairy tale retelling

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I’ll be reading Scarlet by Marissa Meyer. This is the second book in the Lunar Chronicles and after reading Cinder last year, I feel like I need to give the series a chance and continue it.

3. A book with striking typography

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I mean, I have to read A Darker Shade of Magic by Victoria Schwab. Just look at that typography.

4. A book translated from another language

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Since I don’t own too many, I’ll be reading The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank. I never finished it when I started it a few years ago, so it’ll be good to get back into it.

5. A banned book

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For this category I’ll be reading Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut.

Side Quest: Grind

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I hope to read Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor. The cover is stunning and I’ve heard such amazing things about it.

 

Mid Year Book Freak Out Tag

1. Best Book You’ve Read So Far in 2017

Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor.

I know I’m so late to reading this trilogy, but holy moly it is amazing. Daughter of Smoke and Bone was mind-blowing. The world-building, character development, the tension and romance and family elements. It was simply incredible.

 

2. Best Sequel You’ve Read So Far in 2017

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Gemina by Jay Kristoff and Amie Kaufman. Talk about an amazing sequel to Illuminae. I didn’t think they could beat it, and then they did and blew me away again. I can’t.

I have a review for Gemina you can check out here.

 

3. New Release You Haven’t Read Yet But You Want To

Lord of Shadows by Cassandra Clare. But I need to finish Lady Midnight first (I am so sorry, forgive me for not reading it yet) and I’ve been so busy I kind of forgot about it.

4. Most Anticipated Release for The Second Half of the Year

Godsgrave by Jay Kristoff. I mean, Nevernight was insane af. I need to know what happens to Mia.

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5. Biggest Disappointment

A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas.

Now before you hate on me, this book had the biggest hype of all time and I’m just gonna say it: it was a disappointment. I almost DNF’d this because I was so frustrated with it. It felt rushed, there wasn’t much tension anymore and this looming war that was meant to be a major aspect of the trilogy didn’t quite feel so devastating as it should have. And the ending, I mean. Need I say more?

 

6. Biggest Surprise

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The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli. I wasn’t sold by the blurb but decided to give the book a go and it’s one of my favourite YA contemporaries of all time, if not the best.

You can check out my review for this stellar book here.

7. Favourite New Author (Debut or New to You)

Laini Taylor. She is magical! I adore her writing style and the world she created in the Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy (which I am only halfway through).

8. Newest Fictional Crush

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I adore Karou from Daughter of Smoke and Bone. She’s independent, cynical, sassy, has peacock blue hair and is an artist. Marry me.

9. Newest Favourite Character

It has to be AIDAN from the Illuminae Files. I simply love AIDAN to pieces. As an AI, I never thought I would be so attached to it (I don’t know whether AIDAN requires a pronoun?) and his sections in both books were A+. This is a new level of fictional love for characters when they’re technically not human.

 

10. Book That Made You Cry

The Upside of Unrequited. Have you ever seen me ugly cry? That was me with this book.

 

11. Book That Made You Happy

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Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde. I loved the convention setting, the characters, the romances and friendships and ultimate fangirling. It was brilliant.

My review for this baby is here.

 

12. Favourite Book to Movie Adapation You Saw This Year

Do reruns of Harry Potter count? Because I have seen no book to movie adaptions this year yet.

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13. Favourite Review You Wrote This Year

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When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon. It was such a fun book, full of laughter and adorable moments, so my excitement for it really translated in my review. You can check it out here.

14. Most Beautiful Book You’ve Bought So Far this Year (Or Received)

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Caraval by Stephanie Garber. I mean, that cover is divine.

15. What Books Do You Need to Read by the End of the Year?

Ahahahaha, I feel like this is such a looming question. I can imagine this voice in my head saying, “You need to read all these by December 31 or you have failed.”

Anyway, the books I’m hoping to read by the end of the year are:

  • Lady Midnight and Lord of Shadows by Cassandra Clare.
  • The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly.
  • Windwitch by Sarah Dennard.
  • A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab.
  • Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo.
  • Half a King by Joe Abercrombie.
  • Ballad for a Mad Girl by Vikki Wakefield.
  • Stalking Jack the Ripper by Kerri
  • The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon.
  • Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor.
  • The Gentlemen Bastard trilogy by Scott Lynch.

 

If you want to do this tag, do it! I’d love to see what your mid year freak outs are!

My Day at All Day YA #SydneyWritersFestival

With a light nip in the air, the doors to the Riverside Theatres opened. The foyer was buzzing with activity, people from all genders and ages smiling and gathering; a bookselling table was crowded with eager buyers. Tickets were being pulled from book bags as a sound resonated through the building like a school bell. It was time for the first events of The Sydney Writer’s Festival‘s All Day YA program.

Young adult has always been a go-to genre of mine and to have a whole day dedicated to it was simply incredible. Having expanded their program this year, All Day YA hosted ten events with two running parallel to each other and was convened by Catriona Feeney.

All Day YA

Seated in the Love OZ YA Anthology: Begin, End, Begin panel, the theatre was filled with excited voices and subtle tweeting. Run by Danielle Binks, the panel featured Amie Kaufman, Will Kostakis, Jaclyn Moriarty and Gabrielle Tozer, all of whom are brilliant YA Australian writers and offered a lot of insight into the Aussie literature community and the development of the #LoveOzYA hashtag. What started as a meeting of authors in a small restaurant in Melbourne has now started a movement promoting Aussie YA works.

With engaging discussion on diversity, queer content, explosions in space and the importance of literature for young adults, it was an energetic and hilarious panel.

Keeping Company: Characters Across a Series offered an excellent insight into the creation of characters and how they adapt across a long period of time. Run by Catriona Feeney, the authors in discussion were James Bradley, Amie Kaufman, Garth Nix and Lynette Noni whose books range from fantasy to sci-fi to dystopia. What is it that actually keeps characters going across books?

It depends on the author; sometimes there’s a lot of thought involved like questionnaires, casting actors and writing childhoods, or the characters come mostly formed and the author simply fills in the pieces. Lynette trusts in her characters to tell the story and take her through the motions, and James believes you need to know things about them that makes them real, even if it’s not nice. Not all characters will be loved either; one person’s favourite may be someone else’s most disliked for different reasons.

On the topic of side characters, they’re are incredibly important to the story. It’s those interactions that sometimes define pivotal moments throughout a series. Amie gave a lovely analogy about side characters being like seasoning, they’re good in certain amounts without overwhelming the story.

The More than Meets the Eye: Diversity in YA Fiction panel led an eye-opening discussion on the portrayal of diverse Australian teenagers in literature. Mediated by journalist and author Sarah Ayoub, she was joined by writers Randa Abdel-Fattah, Erin Gough and Will Kostakis to talk from personal experience about their sense of identity, the issues within writing diversity in YA and what is it like to be pigeonholed.

Randa kicked off the conversation by stating that as a minority, it is a calling to humanise those who are not represented. As a Muslim woman, she has often been in situations where she’s had to humanise her religion.

On the other hand, Will spoke about the conflict between being a Greek and gay, finding it hard to understand why one is okay to talk about over the other. He found a lot of backlash from Christian schools on his book The Sidekicks which featured a gay character, and has since sought to understand his clash of identities where only one is accepted by society, placing Will in his pigeonhole as a Greek writer.

Following on the thread of identity, Erin Gough said, “I don’t wake up and look in the mirror and say ‘Hey, look, it’s Gay Erin’ … okay sometimes I do.” The inability for writers to not only write about diverse characters but be diverse themselves is a dilemma slowly being addressed.

Talking Tough Topics with Jennifer Niven saw a shift in the room as the heavy issues were dived into. Jennifer was gentle and respectful as discussion moved from relationships, suicide, mental health, body image and dysfunctional families.

She expressed her belief that young adults go through a tough time during their teens with issues that are sometimes not represented in literature. With characters like Libby, Finch, Violet and Jack from her novels, she sought to not only write their story, but address these issues in a way for young adults to understand.

“All of the novels I’ve written are stories I wanted to read,” she said. We can only hope that Jennifer dives further into these topics in her upcoming novels.

This year’s YA program was a success! With a variety of authors, publishers, publicists and editors, the conversations were endless and engaging. The Sydney Writer’s Festival has done a brilliant job at celebrating Australian and international YA stories, leaving us exhilarated and warm-hearted.

Originally published at Chattr

March Wrap Up + April TBR

March has been a hectic month for me with university, editing and bookstagram. I managed to crack 900 followers, I finished editing Taylor‘s novel, and I’m already drowning in assignments. However I did manage to squeeze in some books to tide me over and keep me sane. I did a buddy reading of Gemina with some lovely people on bookstagram such as Beth, who has been an absolute gem to me. I also finally finished the Grisha trilogy with Shelby and she is one of the sweetest people you’ll ever meet.

So, without further ado and ramblings from moi, here is my March wrap up with their respective reaction gifs that sum up how I felt about them.

March Wrap Up

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